Saturday, 23 November 2013

Sharp's Doom Bar: What's the firkin fuss about?

Just want to express my surprise at this average tipple being a forerunner in mainstream beverages
I have tried this thin flavoured ale on many occasions - and it's always the same shallow, virtually characterless ale.
What is all the firkin fuss about Doom Bar?
OK, it's malty , sweet and smooth. However, it amazes me how folk rave about it.
I suppose I should pay homage to the marketeers. They could probably sell sand in the Sahara !
Doom Bar is a most ordinary bitter beer - in the extreme. An ale that dissipates rapido, when served up. And fails to satisfy the most sympathetic of taste buds!
It's a lifeless slurp, as it has limited body and a wishy washy appearance .
I suppose I will get some grief off its dedicated disciples. But for me there is nowt to rave about. It's a firkin non-descript, thin bodied quaff.
But good on yer, Sharp's - or should I say Molson Coors! You seem capable of convincing some of the real ale fraternity, that this amber liquid is a decent drop of ale.
For me and many others, it's the most overrated ale, ever brewed. 
"May I interest you in a Sharp's Doom Bar, Sir?" Err...no thanks. I will give the ale a swerve, and plump for a basic, average, mainstream tipple.

13 comments:

  1. Well I think that there is a debate to be had here. Doom Bar is a predominantly malty beer, which means that it isn't thin at all. It has a good malt body. Not too much evidence of hop character granted. The question is though, what do people actually want in a session ale? Doom Bar is smooth and drinks easily. It has malt flavour, but you could happily drink several pints of an evening, Therefore, if Doom Bar is the only ale on offer (as it was at the pub I was at this evening, as I wanted to see the gig that was on there), then it's a decent session brew. Distinctive ales tend to be ones that you have a pint of, think "Yes that's really good/interesting" then move on to another ale in search of the next distinctive pint. It's horses for courses and many drinkers are not really looking for something distinctive, they're looking for something that they can happily drink a few pints of. That's why John Sm**hs Smooth has a market. Doom Bar is a massive step forward from such swill and if it can convert the J**n Smit*s drinker to cask ale, then it's a good thing. Personally, I always liked Doom Bar, long before it became a national brand, but I always seek out something far more distinctive and interesting if I'm out on a beer drinking evening.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheers for your interesting response Paul. It's good to see that you raise some good points. However, I still maintain that the sweet malty flavour lacks depth for a 4% brew. But it's always good to debate certain issues. :-)

      Delete
  2. Agreed, I've been saying this for years! There are lot better 'mainstream' pints out there, Landlord being the best example. Sharps do do good beers though - I had a 8.5% dry hopped barley wine from them the other month and it was mindblowing!!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well who is fussing about this? Everyone is saying how bland it is. What a straw man blog post.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lots of younger people and folk down south appear to rave about it. And Straw Man? I think that appraisal is a tad unfair coming from a person who will not reveal themselves. A lot of bloggers don't respond to anonymous comments.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I find dishwater is slightly less dull (and much more tasty) !

    ReplyDelete
  6. Couldn't agree more. A bloody awful beer. If one is comparing it to Smooth, them that proves how poor it is. Of course it's thin and with just that malty sweet taste and no hops, one pint a as much as I can manage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheers pal. From a geezer who really knows what he's talking about on beer. That's good enough for me. Everyone seems to be of the same opinion.

      Delete
  7. It's bland, it's malty, it's boring, and I wouldn't be unhappy if I never had another pint of it again.

    I disagree, however, with the assertion that because it's these things, it's the sort of beer people can drink all night. For me the exact opposite is true. Very hoppy beers leave me wanting more because they simultaneously quench the outgoing thirst while creating a new one.

    Dull, predominantly malty ales, on the other hand, are a struggle to get through, and once I've finished the pint, my reaction is likely to be 'thank God that's finished. Can I have something different now'.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely agree Doom Bar was once a fine beer is now the worst beer along with Green King IPA, If a pub only has Doom bar on I ask could you replace it with a local ale in the future, they respond it is popular and sells more than any other ales, I ask which ones have you tried before, they respond they haven't, at this point I leave and say I know lots of people who dislike it, and you have lost another customer.

      Delete
  8. It reminds me of a weaker version of the awful Greene King Abbot Ale which is hopless and very malty. I've never had a good pint of Doom Bore. There's nothing there except the sweet malt. I have tried it but it is not good enough so I now avoid it .

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thought I'd give the Bottled Doombar another go and yes it was truly awful!

    It was flat after a few seconds and completely tasteless to the point where i tipped the rest down the sink.

    ReplyDelete